meandertheworld Rachel Bertsch

meandertheworld Rachel Bertsch

Friday 6 September 11:40 PM · 405 Likes

When we thought about doing the 53km Chilkoot Trail with our daughter, we figured we would have a few challenges.

One of us would have to carry her and a small amount of the items specific to her needs, and the other would have to essentially carry everything the two of us would need for 5 days on the trail.

No big deal, we could do it as the distance between places generally wasn't too far.

Well, it wasn't far in distance but some days took us 10 hours and some days took us two but most took us longer than we had expected. Pack in what you pack out means that our diaper load at the end of the trip weighed about the same as a regular day bag. 
My shoulders told me that my baby carrier backpack was clearly not designed with 5 days backpacking in mind, and my backpacking experience had never included cargo that could jump around and swing me off balance.

It worked. We finished the trail with a big smile on our face and our little Elena became a well known personality at each camp along the way.

We may have smashed our good camera into oblivion on day 2 of this trip, hence some limited and sub par shots, but I don't think we will ever forget that feeling of accomplishment we felt at the end of each day.

Cheers to more challenges ahead for the three of us.  We have two more weeks in the Yukon, then a month cycling across Korea followed by Iceland and Europe. If the Chilkoot taught us anything, it is that anything is possible as long as we take it slow.

Any hints or tips for our upcoming trips will be very appreciated!

meandertheworld: When we thought about doing the 53km Chilkoot Trail with our daughter, we figured we would have a few challenges. One of us would have to carry her and a small amount of the items specific to her needs, and the other would have to essentially carry everything the two of us would need for 5 days on the trail. No big deal, we could do it as the distance between places generally wasn't too far. Well, it wasn't far in distance but some days took us 10 hours and some days took us two but most took us longer than we had expected. Pack in what you pack out means that our diaper load at the end of the trip weighed about the same as a regular day bag. My shoulders told me that my baby carrier backpack was clearly not designed with 5 days backpacking in mind, and my backpacking experience had never included cargo that could jump around and swing me off balance. It worked. We finished the trail with a big smile on our face and our little Elena became a well known personality at each camp along the way. We may have smashed our good camera into oblivion on day 2 of this trip, hence some limited and sub par shots, but I don't think we will ever forget that feeling of accomplishment we felt at the end of each day. Cheers to more challenges ahead for the three of us. We have two more weeks in the Yukon, then a month cycling across Korea followed by Iceland and Europe. If the Chilkoot taught us anything, it is that anything is possible as long as we take it slow. Any hints or tips for our upcoming trips will be very appreciated!

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